Cotton mather public domain essays to do good

Echoing the “We Shall Overcome” mantra that Martin Luther King Jr. evoked in his final sermon, Kendi ends his book on an optimistic note. “There will come a time when racist ideas will no longer obstruct us from seeing the complete and utter abnormality of racial disparities.” Given the deep history and persistence of racist thought that has profoundly characterized American culture, the historian in me is somewhat skeptical of Kendi’s sanguine predictions. One thing is sure. Stamped from the Beginning will be read by future generations. It has the potential to become a classic, must-read chronicle in the vast historiography on antiblack racist thought in the United States. 

There's really only one way you get a tick-transmitted disease and that's from a tick bite. Reducing tick abundance in your yard where you spend a lot of time, wearing tick repellent clothing everyday, treating pets every month with tick repellent spot-on products, getting into a habit of doing a quick body scan for attached poppy-seed sized or larger ticks, and pulling ticks off quickly and safely are all great actions for preventing tick bites. These days, ticks are more than just an annoyance. One bite can make you sick, even change your life! Remember these 10 things and you'll stay safer.

In Salem Village, in February 1692, Betty Parris , age 9, and her cousin Abigail Williams , age 11, the daughter and niece, respectively, of Reverend Samuel Parris, began to have fits described as "beyond the power of Epileptic Fits or natural disease to effect" by John Hale , the minister of the nearby town of Beverly . [26] The girls screamed, threw things about the room, uttered strange sounds, crawled under furniture, and contorted themselves into peculiar positions, according to the eyewitness account of Rev. Deodat Lawson , a former minister in Salem Village. [27]

Cotton Mather's lifelong preoccupation with millennialism and its significance to his thought and work have only recently attracted full-scale attention. Beginning with Things to be Look'd for (1691), he published more than fifty works in which eschatology played a major role. In fact, it is hard to read any of his writings without finding some reference to the imminence of Christ's Second Coming. Of his major works on that topic, three stand out: Problema Theologicum (wr. 1695-1703; publ. 1994), a 95-page manuscript reflecting the principal issues in Mather's early millennialism; Triparadisus , his definitive treatment of his millenarian theories (387 ms. pages) in response to the hermeneutical debate in Europe; and his Biblia Americana , a gargantuan and unfinished critical commentary on the Bible in six folio volumes (c. 4,500 pages folio), fortified with synopses of the best hermeneutical scholarship of the day. Unlike his earlier Problema Theologicum in which Mather advances an inchoate system of pre- and postmillennialist theories, his Threefold Paradise ( Triparadisus ) is his most comprehensive study of apocalypticism. As a hermeneutical defense of revealed religion, Mather's discourse seeks to negotiate between orthodox exegesis of the prophecies and the new philological and historical-contextual challenges to the Scriptures by such European scholars as Hugo Grotius, Thomas Hobbes, Baruch Spinoza, Richard Simon, Henry Hammond, Thomas Burnet, William Whiston, and Anthony Collins. Threefold Paradise marks Mather's decisive break from the hermeneutical positions he had inherited from his intellectual forebears but also represents the culmination of his lifelong interest in eschatology, which lay at the core of his cosmology and which was the fundamental mainspring of his ministerial and theological office. From 1720 to 1726, Mather's exegesis underwent a radical shift from a futurist interpretation of the prophecies to a preterit position--from arguing that several signs of Christ's return were still to be fulfilled, to asserting that all signs had been given several times over. Part I of Mather's Threefold Paradise delineates the history and location of the Garden of Eden as evidenced in the Pentateuch, ancient histories, patristic literature, and contemporary travel accounts. Part II is largely a refutation of psychopannychism, that is, a rebuttal of the idea that the soul is dormant, and a defense of the soul's immortality. Part III is by far the longest and most valuable discussion and covers in twelve subsections a variety of topics affected by the hermeneutical revisionism then taking shape in Europe: the tradition of a literal conflagration of the Earth, his defense of a literal New Heaven and New Earth during the millennium, his allegorization of the conversion of the Jewish people, and his prophetic timetables calculating the millennial reign of Christ. In this late work then, Mather emerges as colonial America's greatest theologian before Jonathan Edwards.

Cotton mather public domain essays to do good

cotton mather public domain essays to do good

Cotton Mather's lifelong preoccupation with millennialism and its significance to his thought and work have only recently attracted full-scale attention. Beginning with Things to be Look'd for (1691), he published more than fifty works in which eschatology played a major role. In fact, it is hard to read any of his writings without finding some reference to the imminence of Christ's Second Coming. Of his major works on that topic, three stand out: Problema Theologicum (wr. 1695-1703; publ. 1994), a 95-page manuscript reflecting the principal issues in Mather's early millennialism; Triparadisus , his definitive treatment of his millenarian theories (387 ms. pages) in response to the hermeneutical debate in Europe; and his Biblia Americana , a gargantuan and unfinished critical commentary on the Bible in six folio volumes (c. 4,500 pages folio), fortified with synopses of the best hermeneutical scholarship of the day. Unlike his earlier Problema Theologicum in which Mather advances an inchoate system of pre- and postmillennialist theories, his Threefold Paradise ( Triparadisus ) is his most comprehensive study of apocalypticism. As a hermeneutical defense of revealed religion, Mather's discourse seeks to negotiate between orthodox exegesis of the prophecies and the new philological and historical-contextual challenges to the Scriptures by such European scholars as Hugo Grotius, Thomas Hobbes, Baruch Spinoza, Richard Simon, Henry Hammond, Thomas Burnet, William Whiston, and Anthony Collins. Threefold Paradise marks Mather's decisive break from the hermeneutical positions he had inherited from his intellectual forebears but also represents the culmination of his lifelong interest in eschatology, which lay at the core of his cosmology and which was the fundamental mainspring of his ministerial and theological office. From 1720 to 1726, Mather's exegesis underwent a radical shift from a futurist interpretation of the prophecies to a preterit position--from arguing that several signs of Christ's return were still to be fulfilled, to asserting that all signs had been given several times over. Part I of Mather's Threefold Paradise delineates the history and location of the Garden of Eden as evidenced in the Pentateuch, ancient histories, patristic literature, and contemporary travel accounts. Part II is largely a refutation of psychopannychism, that is, a rebuttal of the idea that the soul is dormant, and a defense of the soul's immortality. Part III is by far the longest and most valuable discussion and covers in twelve subsections a variety of topics affected by the hermeneutical revisionism then taking shape in Europe: the tradition of a literal conflagration of the Earth, his defense of a literal New Heaven and New Earth during the millennium, his allegorization of the conversion of the Jewish people, and his prophetic timetables calculating the millennial reign of Christ. In this late work then, Mather emerges as colonial America's greatest theologian before Jonathan Edwards.

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